Recent snaps on the Shoreham circular

Last weekend, with one of my sons, I revisited this walk, the most popular on this website. It was still summer on September 2, clearly! This weekend has felt distinctly autumnal by contrast. Instead of walking along the river and the centre of the village, we went straight on after Mill Lane (instead of turning right) and skirted the village to the north, alongside the vineyard. rejoining the valley path to the east of the church. Anyway, having not done it for several months, it was a great reminder of why the walk has such enduring appeal (apart from the fact that it’s so easy to get there on train from SE London). Incredibly verdant in parts, beautiful old buildings peeping out from behind trees and shrubs, the gentle rushing of the Darent, and ‘garden of England’ views from the hillside beyond Filston Lane. Here are some photos; I’d like to know the eventual score between Shoreham and Sidcup…

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Camber Sands and Romney Marsh on a hot holiday Monday

After the verdant delights of Penshurst I headed to the coast on Monday – I knew there’d be terrible traffic but the chance to enjoy Camber Sands on a genuinely hot day was too good to pass up. I took my bike and before hitting the sands cycled 7 miles to Dungeness RSPB reserve and back, via Lydd. The area truly is unique… I think it qualifies as a desert, though not one of sand; after you leave Lydd heading east, shingle and strange scrubby flora take over – nothing to do with the nuclear power station I’m sure. Dunge is a mecca for birders, though it was very quiet when I was there, despite fresh reports of a merlin, marsh harriers, exotic sounding warblers and yellow wagtails all being active and visible. The area is very elemental… little softens the border between land and sky and I wondered what it must be like in winter with an easterly wind. Lydd looks a good village in some ways but quite cut off feeling. Not sure how the ambitious plans for Lydd airport will pan out… seems absurd to expand an airport here, when Manston up at Margate with its huge runway, failed to become a sustainable proposition. Great area though, a wonderful day out. Enjoy the pictures.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Hot bank holiday and Penshurst Place

An unexpectedly superb weekend of weather; it seems to me that late summer and early autumn are now routinely drier and warmer than mid-summer but I’m too lazy to look for figures to back that up. I hope, dear readers, you’ve been able to get out and about. A small component of my family ventured forth by car and bicycle to Penshurst Place (on the Chiddingstone circular walk) yesterday. We parked at Haysden country park a mile or so from Tonbridge station, then cycled the remaining 3.5 miles to Penshurst Place, on lanes at first, then off-road alongside the river Medway.

We passed a good swimming/picnic spot in the river close to the bridge as it passes beneath Ensfield Rd, before ascending the moderate hill at Well Place Farm then freewheeling down the slope to Penshurst Place manor house itself. The gardens are always a joy and so is the cafe by the house in a large courtyard dominated by a lime (I think) tree. I wrote about the house and its interesting history for the Guardian a while back – also got more detail there on how to get there and prices. A great afternoon out if you are fancy free on the bank holiday but best done with a car/bike combination.

There are trains from Victoria (via East Croydon) and London Bridge but Penshurst station is two miles from the house. I haven’t devised a walking route from the station away from the road yet but there must be one. Hmm…

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Metropole Orchestra’s Charles Mingus tribute at the Proms

Metropole Orchestra’s Charles Mingus tribute at the Proms

A bit off the beaten track here, but I ventured to the Proms for the first time in my life this week and caught a truly magnificent concert by the Dutch Metropole Orkest. Joined by brilliant soloists and a great vocalist from the UK and US, the orchestra performed songs associated with and by the bassist/composer Charlie Mingus, including two superb Joni Mitchell tracks. Here’s my review (slighty hurried in the writing) at Jazzwise magazine.

Biggin Hill airshow

Just a heads up that the Biggin Hill airshow is back next weekend (19-20 August). This year’s event is a bit bigger than the recent ones and features on Sunday the French air force’s display team, the Patrouille de France (and the Red Arrows). Very spectacular. There will also be three extremely noisy modern jet fighters performing as well as Spitfires, Hurricanes, Lancaster and various stunt and biplanes, some of first world war vintage. Worth getting tickets for, or at least taking the Downe circular walk for a peek. If you don’t like that kind of thing then take a walk a long way away!

Update: 26 August. Well the airshow proved a great success with brilliant displays and a very supportive crowd. The weather behaved too, despite being a little cold on the Saturday – although as you can see from my pix cloud cover was variable. The Red Arrows and Patrouille de France were extraordinary – amazing skill and training. The jet fighters (Typhoon, F-16, Gripen) all splendidly noisy and rapid and the solo Spitfires actually quite moving considering the location. The sight of Hurricanes, Spitfires and the B-17 over the countryside was very evocative as always. For some truly epic photographs of the event by a pro, take a look here.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Festivals and blackberries at Hever

Anyone doing the Hever walk  this weekend will be in for a (hopefully pleasant) surprise. At Wilderness Farm, in the south-east corner of the walk, the Neverland Festival is in full swing and the footpath between Stock Wood and Newtye Hurst Wood goes right through it (stewards are on the gate to check wristbands). Expect to see a lot of pirates, mermaids and lost boys, and hear some great bands. As festivals go it’s small scale and in a beautiful setting – definitely one for the diary next year. There are more festivals coming up at the site. I personally think they add to the walk in a funny kind of way.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Meanwhile, further down the path there are some great unpicked blackberries (well, not any more) lining both sides of the path for 300 metres. In these days of foraging (presumably the whole population will be at it after Brexit!) it’s rare to find so many. Now I just need to freeze them.